Phase Focus | PHASEFOCUS ANNOUNCES FREE DOWNLOADS OF MOST VIEWED PAPERS ON ADVANCES WITH THE PHASEFOCUS VIRTUAL LENS
Phasefocus brings to multiple markets a range of products and services based on its proprietary Phasefocus Virtual Lens®
phasefocus, phase focus, Live Cell Imaging, Ophthalmic Metrology, Electron Microscopy, virtual lens
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PHASEFOCUS ANNOUNCES FREE DOWNLOADS OF MOST VIEWED PAPERS ON ADVANCES WITH THE PHASEFOCUS VIRTUAL LENS

09:28 11 March in News

OSA is providing free access to two of its most downloaded papers, describing advances of the Phasefocus Virtual Lens®.

Two peer-reviewed articles that demonstrate advances in Phasefocus’ technology feature among the top twenty most-downloaded image processing papers published by the Optical Society of America over a two year period.

These popular articles describe Phasefocus’ advanced tomographic 3D reconstruction approach, which has applications for imaging thick samples such as biological tissues; and a super- resolution method that enables data to be extrapolated beyond the area of the detection sensor.

This sustained technical interest parallels advances in Phasefocus’ products and services in the areas of cell imaging, metrology and electron microscopy.

OSA is providing free access to these articles for the next 30 days; download them at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAA.29.001606
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAA.28.000604

Speaking on this exciting news, CEO Ian Pykett is pleased to see the extent to which the Phasefocus Virtual Lens technology (known academically as ptychography) is being accepted and adopted. “Hearing of the success of these papers is clear recognition of the growing interest in the use of the Phasefocus Virtual Lens technology. Having already demonstrated its capability to improve resolution in electron microscopy and to characterise ophthalmic lenses, we are now seeing strong interest in its ability to perform phenotypic screening via label-free live cell assays.” In the context of this latest application, Head of Imaging & Cytometry at the University of York, Dr Peter O’Toole describes ptychography as “one of the most important breakthroughs in imaging. It addresses many of the fundamental problems inherent in current microscopy techniques.”